The three priorities nursing leaders should have for the rest of the year

This year has been a roller coaster so far, with influenza and COVID-19 wreaking havoc in healthcare facilities across the country and world.

While many of us may still be in recovery – or even survival – mode it’s important to not lose sight of the longer-term goals for your team and organization.

Nurse job satisfaction

If you want high quality of care, your nurses’ overall satisfaction with their job is vital. It’s easy to see that happier nurses are going to offer a better patient experience than ones who are miserable. And the research backs it up.

The American Nurses Association’s National Database of Nursing Quality Indicators (NDNQI) collects information from U.S. hospitals to help healthcare organizations pinpoint areas for improvement. Using that data, researchers have found a direct link between nurses’ job satisfaction and patient outcomes. For example, they noted that a 25% increase in nurse job enjoyment over two years was linked to a quality of care increase between 5% and 20%.

That job satisfaction quotient may be particularly challenging right now. After months of turmoil and stress, with potentially more to come, don’t forget to check in on your nurses to find out how they’re holding up. Schedule one-on-one meetings to talk things through and evaluate how they are doing.

However, the biggest key to job satisfaction is improving staffing and nurse scheduling, especially when it to comes to nurse-patient ratios and helping nurses preserve their work/life balance. Learn how ABILITY SMARTFORCE Scheduler can help with both.

Turnover

Turnover has a direct link to job satisfaction. If nurses are unhappy, they are more likely to quit.

In 2019, we saw the turnover rate for bedside RNs decrease 1.3% and it stands at 15.9% right now, according to the 2020 NSI National Health Care Retention & RN Staffing Report. While a dip in turnover is certainly good news, it’s still too high and the cost can be devastating.

In fact, according to the same report, the average cost of turnover for a bedside RN is $44,400 and, ranges from $33,300 to $56,000. For the average hospital, we’re talking about losses in the $3.6 to $6.1 million range. Most can’t sustain that. Besides, we’re already facing a nursing shortage as it is, and you can’t afford to lose good people.

Again, after prolonged upheaval and stress, many of your nurses could be thinking about quitting or even leaving the profession altogether. Prioritizing their job satisfaction is critical to keeping them onboard.

Training and nurse development

Developing staff is one of the smartest ways to both retain nurses and attract new ones. It’s also a way to increase the overall skill sets and value of your staff. With every skill they learn, they improve your organization’s ability to provide a high quality of care.

It’s critical to provide in-house training and development programs to keep their clinical skills fresh. However, also provide training that goes beyond that. Training in communication, conflict resolution and leadership makes nurses more capable in their current roles, while also preparing them for future management and leadership roles.

The challenge is often creating the time for them to take training on top of long shifts. Still, it’s important to do so, if you want the best and brightest nurses working for you.

To see firsthand how you can improve your staffing process, request a demo of ABILITY SMARTFORCE Scheduler.

 

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